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The Rise & Fall of the Mongol Empire - Anne F. Broadbridge

The Rise & Fall of the Mongol Empire - Anne F. Broadbridge


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Trace the rise and fall of the Mongol Empire which, under the leadership of Genghis Khan, became the largest contiguous land empire in history.

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It was the largest contiguous land empire in history— stretching from Korea to Ukraine, and from Siberia to southern China. And was forged on the open plains. In the 12th century, the East Asian steppe was home to scattered groups of nomads who, by 1206, would be united under the innovative leadership of a man named Temujin. Anne F. Broadbridge details the rise and fall of the Mongol Empire.

Lesson by Anne F. Broadbridge, directed by Globizco Studios. View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-mongol-empire-anne-f-broadbridge


The rise and fall of the Mongol Empire – Anne F. Broadbridge

It was the largest contiguous land empire in history— stretching from Korea to Ukraine, and from Siberia to southern China. And was forged on the open plains. In the 12th century, the East Asian steppe was home to scattered groups of nomads who, by 1206, would be united under the innovative leadership of a man named Temujin. Anne F. Broadbridge details the rise and fall of the Mongol Empire.

Lesson by Anne F. Broadbridge, directed by Globizco Studios.

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View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-mongol-empire-anne-f-broadbridge

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Monday, September 17, 2018

Monday, September 17, 2018

Professor Anne Broadbridge recently published her new book Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire with Cambridge University Press. Find more information here.

About the book (from the publisher):

How did women contribute to the rise of the Mongol Empire while Mongol men were conquering Eurasia? This book positions women in their rightful place in the otherwise well-known story of Chinggis Khan (commonly known as Genghis Khan) and his conquests and empire. Examining the best known women of Mongol society, such as Chinggis Khan's mother, Hö'elün, and senior wife, Börte, as well as those who were less famous but equally influential, including his daughters and his conquered wives, we see the systematic and essential participation of women in empire, politics and war. Anne F. Broadbridge also proposes a new vision of Chinggis Khan's well-known atomized army by situating his daughters and their husbands at the heart of his army reforms, looks at women's key roles in Mongol politics and succession, and charts the ways the descendants of Chinggis Khan's daughters dominated the Khanates that emerged after the breakup of the Empire in the 1260s.


Book and Articles

“Marriage, Family and Politics: The Ilkhanid-Oirat Connection.” In Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society . Special edition, edited by Timothy May and Peter Jackson. [Festschrift for David O. Morgan] London, Forthcoming, 2016.

“Careers in Diplomacy among Mamluks and Mongols, 1260-1341.” In Proceedings of the "Mamluk Cairo, a Crossroad for Embassies," Conference, 6-8 September 2012, Liège, Belgium . Forthcoming, Brill, 2015.

“Spy or Rebel? The Curious Incident of the Temürid Sulṭān-Ḥusayn’s Defection to the Mamluks at Damascus in 1400-01/803.” In Mamluk Studies Review XIV (2010): 29-42.

“Sending Home for Mom and Dad: The Extended Family Impulse in Mamluk Politics.” Mamluk Studies Review 12 (2008): 1-18.

“Diplomatic Conventions in the Mamluk Sultanate.” Annales Islamologiques 41 (2007): 97-118.

“Apostasy Trials in Eighth/Fourteenth Century Egypt and Syria: A Case Study.” In The History and Historiography of Central Asia: a Festschrift for John E. Woods . Ed. Judith Pfeiffer and Sholeh A. Quinn in collaboration with Ernest Tucker. (Wiesbaden, 2006): 363-82.

“Monarchy, Islamic.” Dictionary of the History of Ideas . Ed. Maryanne Cline Horowitz. Charles Scribner’s Sons (2004): 4:1494-96.

“Royal Authority, Justice and Order in Society: The Influence of Ibn Khaldun on the Writings of Maqrizi and Ibn Taghribirdi .” Mamluk Studies Review 7 ii (2003): 231-45.

“ Mamluk legitimacy and the Mongols: the Reigns of Baybars and Qalawun.” Mamluk Studies Review 5 (2000): 91-118.

“Academic Rivalry and the Patronage System: al- Maqrizi , al- Ayni and Ibn Hajar al- Asqalani .” Mamluk Studies Review 3 (1999): 85-107.

Review of Dohris Behrens- Abouseif , Practising Diplomacy in the Mamluk Sultanate: Gifts and Material Cultural in the Medieval Islamic World (London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2014), for Journal of Islamic Studies , forthcoming.

Review of Nimroz Luz, The Mamluk City in the Middle East: History, Culture and the Urban Landscape , Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014), for Jerusalem Studies in Arabic and Islam , forthcoming.

Review of Ron Sela , The Legendary Biographies of Tamerlane: Islam and Heroic Apocrypha in Central Asia (Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011) for Journal of the American Oriental Society 133.4 (Oct-Dec 2013): 715-717.

Review of Timothy May, The Mongols in World History (London: Reaktion Books, 2012) for The Journal of World History 24:3 (December 2013), 696-699.

Review of John Lash Meloy , Imperial Power and Maritime Trade: Mecca and Cairo in the Later Middle Ages . Chicago Studies on the Middle East (Chicago: Middle East Documentation Center, 2010) in International Journal of Middle East Studies 44 (2011): 168-170.

Review of Ali Anooshahr , The Ghazi Sultans and the Frontiers of Islam: A comparative study of the late medieval and early modern periods , Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern History (London and New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 2009) in International Journal of Middle East Studies 42:3 (2010) .


Frequently bought together

Review

'Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire shall become one of the main reference books not only for the history of Mongol women, but of Mongol empire as a whole. Its analysis of the role of women, especially during the formation and the decades of the united Mongol Empire, is of special relevance for anyone interested in this period. Anne F. Broadbridge has managed to succeed in the always difficult task of combining a solid research with an accessible language that will certainly make this read appealing to scholars and students alike.' Bruno De Nicola, Goldsmiths College, University of London

'A brilliant addition and timely corrective to the study of the Mongol Empire. Professor Broadbridge has produced an exciting and unique contribution to the scholarship of the Mongol Empire which will forever change our understanding of the Mongol elite.' Timothy May, University of North Georgia

'This book is far more than a gendered history of the Mongol Empire. By exploring the highly complex place of women and marriage in imperial politics, it helps to make sense of the alignments within the imperial dynasty and the actions and policies of Mongol khans and princes.' Peter Jackson, Keele University

'In this intelligent and original book, Anne F. Broadbridge has carried the study of women in the Mongol Empire to a new level, and has made an important contribution to our understanding of the Mongol Empire as a whole. The analysis goes well beyond the lives and activities of the most prominent Mongol women to show how dynastic marriages shaped central military institutions and brought manpower into the Mongol enterprise. In examining the family strategies of both privileged and secondary wives, Broadbridge sheds much new light on the difficult and disputed question of tribes within Mongol society, and will be a valuable resource for all future work. Finally, in her fascinating chapters on conquered women, she investigates the emotional and social lives of a group of women who have until now been largely overlooked, but nonetheless played an important part in Mongol history. This work thus offers important new insights on the formation of the Mongol Empire and its successor states.' Beatrice Manz, Tufts University, Massachusetts

'Broadbridge’s richly detailed book makes a valuable contribution to this debate by clarifying the roles played by Chinggisid women, both before the Mongol conquest of China and after the establishment of the Yuan dynasty.' Bret Hinsch, NAN NÜ

'… Broadbridge’s book is impeccably researched. It is a welcome addition to the field of Mongol Empire history. For many decades to come, students will be turning to Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire for a comprehensive and thoughtful account of why and how women mattered to the Mongols and their empire.' Jinping Wang, American Historical Review

‘Broadbridge’s book will be a bonanza of information for future anthropologists, women’s studies scholars, and sociologists. Scholars in Mongolia, China, the Middle East, and Russia will find her work engaging and invaluable. Hers is and will remain the best pioneering work on the subject. Broadbridge, more than any other scholar, has laid the groundwork for what will follow.’ David Curtis Wright, Journal of Interdisciplinary History


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By Anne F. Broadbridge

This book is far more than a gendered history of the Mongol Empire. By exploring the highly complex place of women and marriage in imperial politics, it helps to make sense of the alignments within the imperial dynasty and the actions and policies of Mongol khans and princes.

Peter Jackson, Keele University

In this intelligent and original book, Anne F. Broadbridge has carried the study of women in the Mongol Empire to a new level, and has made an important contribution to our understanding of the Mongol Empire as a whole. The analysis goes well beyond the lives and activities of the most prominent Mongol women to show how dynastic marriages shaped central military institutions and brought manpower into the Mongol enterprise. In examining the family strategies of both privileged and secondary wives, Broadbridge sheds much new light on the difficult and disputed question of tribes within Mongol society, and will be a valuable resource for all future work. Finally, in her fascinating chapters on conquered women, she investigates the emotional and social lives of a group of women who have until now been largely overlooked, but nonetheless played an important part in Mongol history. This work thus offers important new insights on the formation of the Mongol Empire and its successor states.


Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire (Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization) Hardcover – Import, 18 July 2018

'Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire shall become one of the main reference books not only for the history of Mongol women, but of Mongol empire as a whole. Its analysis of the role of women, especially during the formation and the decades of the united Mongol Empire, is of special relevance for anyone interested in this period. Anne F. Broadbridge has managed to succeed in the always difficult task of combining a solid research with an accessible language that will certainly make this read appealing to scholars and students alike.' Bruno De Nicola, Goldsmiths College, University of London

'A brilliant addition and timely corrective to the study of the Mongol Empire. Professor Broadbridge has produced an exciting and unique contribution to the scholarship of the Mongol Empire which will forever change our understanding of the Mongol elite.' Timothy May, University of North Georgia

'This book is far more than a gendered history of the Mongol Empire. By exploring the highly complex place of women and marriage in imperial politics, it helps to make sense of the alignments within the imperial dynasty and the actions and policies of Mongol khans and princes.' Peter Jackson, Keele University

'In this intelligent and original book, Anne F. Broadbridge has carried the study of women in the Mongol Empire to a new level, and has made an important contribution to our understanding of the Mongol Empire as a whole. The analysis goes well beyond the lives and activities of the most prominent Mongol women to show how dynastic marriages shaped central military institutions and brought manpower into the Mongol enterprise. In examining the family strategies of both privileged and secondary wives, Broadbridge sheds much new light on the difficult and disputed question of tribes within Mongol society, and will be a valuable resource for all future work. Finally, in her fascinating chapters on conquered women, she investigates the emotional and social lives of a group of women who have until now been largely overlooked, but nonetheless played an important part in Mongol history. This work thus offers important new insights on the formation of the Mongol Empire and its successor states.' Beatrice Manz, Tufts University, Massachusetts

'Broadbridge's richly detailed book makes a valuable contribution to this debate by clarifying the roles played by Chinggisid women, both before the Mongol conquest of China and after the establishment of the Yuan dynasty.' Bret Hinsch, NAN NÜ

'… Broadbridge's book is impeccably researched. It is a welcome addition to the field of Mongol Empire history. For many decades to come, students will be turning to Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire for a comprehensive and thoughtful account of why and how women mattered to the Mongols and their empire.' Jinping Wang, American Historical Review

'Broadbridge's book will be a bonanza of information for future anthropologists, women's studies scholars, and sociologists. Scholars in Mongolia, China, the Middle East, and Russia will find her work engaging and invaluable. Hers is and will remain the best pioneering work on the subject. Broadbridge, more than any other scholar, has laid the groundwork for what will follow.' David Curtis Wright, Journal of Interdisciplinary History


Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire

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Commodity and Exchange in the Mongol Empire: A Cultural History of Islamic Textiles.

By THOMAS T. ALLSEN. Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization. Cambridge: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1997. Pp. 137. $49.95.

Several of the previous volumes in this series have dealt with the Mongols, notably Beatrice Forbes Manz's biography of Tamerlane, The Rise and Rule of Tamerlane (1989), and Reuven Amitai-Preiss's study of the war between the Mongols and Mamluks in the 1260s and 1270s, Mongols and Mamluks (1995). This volume on the cultural transmission of textiles by the Mongols is a welcome and worthy addition.

Allsen sets out the problem and its parameters in his introductory chapter. A wide array of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century sources from Europe to China mention "tartar cloth." Anne Wardwell had identified these so-called panni tartarici as drawloom silks woven with gold, and Allsen connects these cloths to the textiles called nasij in the Arabic sources and nakh in Persian, generically meaning woven stuff or textile and then more narrowly denoting a cloth of silk and gold. The question Allsen poses is how did the Mongols become so identified with this particular type of luxury textile.

To answer the question, Allsen addresses a series of interrelated questions. In chapter two, on consumption and use, he examines how true the image was of Mongols draped in gold cloth. He cites a large body of textual evidence showing the wide use of gold textiles for tents and clothing, including headgear, girdles, shoes and, especially, robes. Much of the textual evidence is anecdotal, but by its sheer volume it is convincing.

In chapter three, on acquisition and production, Allsen turns to the mechanisms of supply to understand how the Mongols met this apparently insatiable demand for gold cloth. The silk itself came from China, and the limited amount of gold needed was available through reuse, tribute, or deposits in the frontier provinces. The most important element, the artisans, were, he suggests, imported from West Asia. He describes three colonies of artisans that were taken during the Mongol campaigns of 1219-22 in Turkestan and Khurasan. All three were first organized under Chinggis and Ogodei and then reorganized under Qubilai in the 1270s.

In the fourth chapter, on clothing and color, Allsen examines questions of cultural tradition to explain why the Mongols were so attracted to gold brocade. He argues that it was an indigenous cultural value which existed before the rise of the Mongol empire. After reviewing the importance of clothing and textiles to the nomadic tradition, in general, he notes that the Mongols, in particular, systematically equated gold with imperial authority and legitimacy.

In chapter five, on cultural transmission, Allsen argues that cloth of gold was only one component of the textile tradition that the Mongols transported from West Asia to China. Other fabrics, such a camlet (cloth made of camel's hair), were introduced into China at this time. So were western-style tents, tensile structures supported by poles and guy ropes (as opposed to compression-type yurts supported on trellises). Dyes may have been, too, including the famous West Asian qirmis, a dye derived from the dried bodies of several insects of the coccid family. New clothing terminology and styles were also introduced. Allsen argues, for example, that the jisun, the Chinese ceremonial robe of one color, was derived from West Asian precedents through the intermediary of the Uighurs. He concludes with two other institutions introduced to China at this time: investiture and the tiraz, the practice of court-sponsored production of inscribed textiles in state workshops and their distribution to the court.

Finally, in his concluding chapter, Allsen sets the question of gold cloth in the wider perspective of trade and exchange along the silk road as far back, perhaps, as 1000 B.C. Although gold cloth is somewhat different from other examples (this exchange entailed a transfer of artisans, not just of the products of their looms), Allsen argues that it can be also used to exemplify the general process of cultural borrowing or acculturation. Luxury goods, he suggests, were a form of political currency and, far from being superfluous, were an essential element in the formulation and maintenance of the premodern state.

I found this a fascinating and absorbing essay. Prof. Allsen brings to it a wealth of knowledge and a control of myriad exotic languages. The bibliography runs to twenty pages, with something like five hundred citations. Despite (or perhaps because of) his erudition, Allsen writes clearly and logically, with an occasional flash of wit, as for example, in his refusal (p. 106) to see the people of the steppe as a premodern equivalent of the United Parcel Service disinterestedly ferrying motifs and ideas over vast areas of Asia. All in all, I was convinced by his argument.

What is deplorably missing in this volume, however, is any visual material. It is simply unacceptable that the editors produced this book without a single map. The argument revolves around geographical transmission over much of Eurasia, but few people could possibly be familiar with all the sites mentioned in this text, especially since some have been only recently (and tentatively) identified. Also missing (except for a small black-and-white illustration on the dustjacket of Qubilai hunting, taken from a Yuan-period scroll) are any contemporary depictions of textiles or garments or examples of extant gold cloth. For these, readers must turn to James Watt's and Anne Wardwell's When Silk Was Gold: Chinese and Central Asian Textiles, the superbly illustrated catalogue of an exhibition held in Cleveland and New York in the fall and spring of 1997-98. Allsen notes (p. 10) that he is not a specialist on textiles and cannot speak to technical matters. This is true, and Watt and Wardwell take up that part of the argument. By eschewing all visual material, however, Allsen and Cambridge University Press further the divide between a broad audience of museum-goers, art lovers, and textiles specialists who buy and cite lavishly illustrated catalogues and a small group of scholars who read intriguing but drab monographs such as this one.


Mongolian Royalty

Unless otherwise noted, these books are for sale at Amazon.com. Your purchase through these links will result in a commission for the owner of the Royalty.nu site.

History & Royalty

Encyclopedia of Mongolia and the Mongolian Empire by Christopher Pratt Atwood. The first comprehensive A-to-Z encyclopedia of the Mongols, from prehistory to modern times.

Marriage as Political Strategy and Cultural Expression by George Qingzhi Zhao. Mongolian royal marriages from world empire to the Yuan dynasty.

The Bloody White Baron: The Extraordinary Story of the Russian Nobleman Who Became the Last Khan of Mongolia by James Palmer. Baron Ungern-Sternberg took over Mongolia in 1920 with a ragtag force. His monarchy lasted only a few months.

Historical Dictionary of Mongolia by Alan J. K. Sanders. Focuses on modern Mongolia, but the chronology provides information on the country's long history. Includes a bibliography and a map.

Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan: Life, Death, and Resurrection by John Man. This biography paints a vivid picture of the man himself, the places where he lived and fought, and the passions that surround him still.

Genghis Khan by James Chambers. Biography of the 13th century Mongolian emperor who ruled the largest empire ever conquered by a single commander.

Genghis Khan by Michael Hoang. Shows that the "bloodthirsty barbarian" was also a visionary statesman and strategic genius.

Genghis Khan: History's Greatest Empire Builder by Paul Lococo Jr. How the son of a minor Mongol chieftain created a military machine that conquered China, Central Asia, and Persia.

Genghis Khan: His Life and Legacy by Paul Ratchnevsky, translated by Thomas Nivison Haining. Draws on Mongol, Chinese, Persian, and European sources to provide a readable account of the life of one of the greatest conquerors in world history.

Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire by Jean-Paul Roux. An in-depth survey of the legendary Mongol conqueror and his empire.

Genghis Khan by R. P. Lister. This biography tells the story of the conqueror's early life and rise to power.

Chinggis Khan by Ruth W. Dunnell. Biography of Mongolian leader Genghis Khan, intended for students.

Books by Jack Weatherford

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford. The astonishing story of Genghis Khan and his descendants, and their conquest and transformation of the world.

The Secret History of the Mongol Queens by Jack Weatherford. How the daughters of Genghis Khan rescued his empire.

Genghis Khan and the Quest for God by Jack Weatherford. How the 13th century conqueror harnessed the power of religion to rule the largest empire the world has ever known.

Kublai Khan

Khubilai Khan: His Life and Times by Morris Rossabi. Biography of Genghis Khan's grandson Kublai Khan, one of history's most renowned figures.

A Brief History of Khubilai Khan: Lord of Xanadu, Founder of the Yuan Dynasty, Emperor of China by Jonathan Clements. Biography. Grandson of bloodthirsty Mongol leader Genghis Khan, Khubilai Khan had a profound impact on Asian history.

Kublai Khan by John Man. Biography. Kublai Khan inherited an empire from his grandfather, Genghis Khan, and extended it further. His domain covered 60 percent of Asia and one-fifth of the world's land area.

Tamerlane (Timur)

The Rise and Rule of Tamerlane by Beatrice Forbes Manz. The first serious study of Tamerlane, the great nomad conqueror who rose to power in 1370 on the ruins of the Mongol Empire.

The Age of Tamerlane by David Nicolle. Tells the remarkable story of Timur-i-Lenk (Timur the Lame) and details the organization, tactics, arms and armour of his all-conquering army.

Tamerlane and the Jews by Michael Shterenshis. Introduction to the history of Jewish life in 14th century Asia and the attitude of Timur and his successors to the Jews.

The Mongol Empire

Historical Dictionary of the Mongol World Empire by Paul D. Buell. Covers the history of the Mongol Empire, the pre-imperial era of Mongolian history, and Mongol successor states.

Women and the Making of the Mongol Empire by Anne F. Broadbridge. Examines women such as Genghis Khan's mother, senior wife, daughters, and conquered wives.

Genghis Khan: Conqueror of the World by Leo De Hartog. Analyzes how Genghis Khan united Mongol tribes and invade Europe.

Genghis Khan and Mongol Rule by George Lane. Examines the Mongols' contribution to international trade and cultural exchange during the medieval age. Includes biographical sketches, a glossary, maps, illustrations, and primary documents.

The History of the Mongol Conquests by J. J. Saunders. A carefully documented introductory history of the rise and fall of the great Mongol empire.

The Travels of Marco Polo by Marco Polo. The 14th century adventurer Marco Polo tells of his travels through places including Persia, the land of the Tartars, Tibet, India, and, most important, China, where he stayed at the court of Mongolian emperor Kublai Khan.

The Story of the Mongols, Whom We Call the Tartars by Giovannia Di Plano Carpini. Written by a 13th century Franciscan friar who was sent on a formal mission to the Mongolian empire by Pope Innocent IV. Carpini met Genghis Khan's grandson Batu.

Imperial Mongolian Cooking: Recipes From the Kingdoms of Genghis Khan by Marc Cramer. The first-ever collection of recipes from a civilization that ruled over some two dozen countries. Includes sample menus.

The Secret History of the Mongols

The Secret History of the Mongols: A Mongolian Epic Chronicle of the Thirteenth Century translated by Igor De Rachewiltz. Written partly in prose and partly in epic poetry, the Secret History is the major native source on Genghis Khan and his son and successor Ogadai (Ögödei). This translation includes an historical introduction and extensive commentary.

The Secret History of the Mongols: The Life and Times of Chinggis Khan translated by Urgunge Onon. This fresh translation brings out the excitement of the epic with wide-ranging commentaries on military and social conditions, religion and philosophy.

Central Asia's Nomads

The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia by Rene Grousset. Traces the development of the steppes, from the early Scythians and Huns to the last emperors of 18th century Mongolia, and discusses the important leaders of each period.

Nomadic Empires: From Mongolia to the Danube by Gerard Chaliand. From the fifth century BC to the 15th century AD, the steppe areas of Asia were a "zone of turbulence," threatening settled peoples from China to Russia and Hungary. This book examines the nomadic people called Indo-Europeans, Turkic peoples, or Mongols.

Mongol War and Warriors

Genghis Khan & the Mongol Conquests, 1190-1400 by Stephen R. Turnbull. A concise account of the Mongol conquests, including the rise of Genghis Khan and the unification of the tribes, with information on campaign logistics, tactics, and horse breeding.

Mongol Warrior 1200-1350 by Stephen R. Turnbull, illustrated by Wayne Reynolds. Tells the story of the Mongol empire's remarkable military organization, including details of weaponry, tactics, training, and beliefs.

The Golden Horde & Tartars

The Silk Road and the Cities of the Golden Horde by German A. Fedorov-Davydov. Historical reconstruction of the descendants of Genghis Khan who raided and traded with civilizations in the East and West.

Kingship and Ideology in the Islamic and Mongol Worlds by Anne F. Broadbridge. What it meant to be a monarch in the pre-modern Islamic world, and how ideas about sovereignty evolved.

A Thousand Years of the Tartars by Edward Harper Parker. History of the Tartars in East Asia from the 15th century B.C. through the 12th century A.D., when they were conquered by Genghis Khan.

The Tartar Khan's Englishman by Gabriel Ronay. Biography of a mysterious Englishman who acted as personal envoy, interpreter and spy for Batu Khan, grandson of Genghis Khan and ruler of the Golden Horde.

Modern Travels & Advice

Lonely Planet Mongolia by Robert Storey. This travel guide includes information on Mongolia's history and historic sites.

In the Empire of Genghis Khan: An Amazing Odyssey Through the Lands of the Most Feared Conquerors in History by Stanley Stewart. The author describes his travels across the old empire, from Istanbul to the distant homeland of the Mongol hordes.

Managing a Dental Practice: The Genghis Khan Way by Michael Young. Yes, that's the book's actual title. Genghis Khan was "one of history's most charismatic and dynamic leaders -- and you will need all his skill and tenacity to succeed in dentistry and business."

Fiction & Drama

The Tiger Queens: The Women of Genghis Khan by Stephanie Thornton. In the late 12th century, brilliant, charismatic Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan ascends to power. But it is the women who stand beside him who ensure his triumph.

The Earth Is the Lord's by Taylor Caldwell. A novel about the rise and fall of Genghis Khan from a popular 20th century author.

The Blue Wolf by Frederic Dion. An epic historical novel about the life of Genghis Khan and the empire of the steppes.

Tamburlaine the Great by Christopher Marlowe. A 16th century English play about the ruthless conqueror. This play was a great success on the Elizabethan stage.

By Conn Iggulden

Genghis: Birth of an Empire by Conn Iggulden. First novel in a series about the life of Genghis Khan. After surviving a brutal childhood, he is driven by a singular fury: to kill before being killed, and to conquer enemies beyond the horizon.

Genghis: Lords of the Bow by Conn Iggulden. Genghis leads his warriors across the Gobi Desert into a realm his people have never seen before.

Genghis: Bones of the Hills by Conn Iggulden. Stalked by enemies and plagued by a divided family, the Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan leads a sprawling force of horsemen beyond the realm of their known world.

Khan: Empire of Silver by Conn Iggulden. Genghis Khan is dead. His vast empire hangs in the balance as his heirs maneuver for dominance.

Conqueror: A Novel of Kublai Khan by Conn Iggulden. About the rise of Genghis Khan's grandson Kublai, a refined and scholarly man who devises new ways of warfare as he builds the dream city of Xanadu and pursues the ultimate prize: the ancient empire of Sung China.

Teen & Children's Books About Mongolia

Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan by Demi. An illustrated biography based on both history and legend, for children ages 9 to 12.

Genghis Khan: Fierce Mongolian Conqueror by PV Knight. Biography of the Mongolian nomad who built an empire across three continents. For children ages 9 to 13.

Genghis Khan by Brenda Lange. Traces the life of the chief of a small Mongol tribe who established a vast empire in the 12th century. For young adult readers.

Genghis Khan: Creating the Mongol Empire by Barbara M. Linde. Biography for ages 12 to 15.

Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire by Don Nardo. Nonfiction for young adult readers.

Genghis Khan: 13th Century Mongolian Tyrant by Enid Goldberg and Norman Itzkowitz. For young adult readers.

Other

Kubla Khan: The Emperor of Everything by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Robert Byrd. Biography in picture book form for children ages 4 to 8.

Daughter of Xanadu by Dori Jones Yang. Fiction for young adult readers. Princess Emmajin, granddaughter of the Great Khan Khubilai, is determined to become a warrior. The last thing she wants is the distraction of the foreigner Marco Polo.


Watch the video: The rise and fall of the Mongol Empire - Anne F. Broadbridge (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Makoto

    It is necessary to try all

  2. Tohias

    What words... super, a remarkable idea

  3. Fenrizragore

    I know it is necessary to do)))



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