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Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley

Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley


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Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley

Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley

Every army in the First World War relied on horsepower to a remarkable extent. The British alone used around one million horses during the war, of which over half died. Unsurprisingly these horses attracted the attention of many war artists, who produced a wide range of paintings, covering different types of horses and artistic styles.

Artistically we get a wide range of styles, including formal oils, watercolour and various modernist styles (this differs from a recent book on postcards of the Great War, where modernist styles were almost completely absent). Most of the pictures are from British artists and represent British topics, although there are one or two exceptions in the main text, and a short chapter devoted to the American army.

The paintings portray a wide range of topics, including the classic cavalry charge, scenes behind the lines, towing supplies or artillery, a rather sentimental picture showing a soldier saying good bye to a dying horse (produced for an animal charity), and enough sporting scenes to help explain why some of the infantry resented the cavalry so much.

The book follows a simple but effective format. Each double page spread has one page of text and one page with a full colour reproduction of an artwork. The text mixes historical background with a description of the painting, so there is a context for each picture. The author is perhaps a little prone to exaggerating the role of the mounted cavalry in the defensive battles of 1918, but is otherwise accurate (the cavalry did play a major role in these battles, but serving as mounted infantry, using its horses to reach the threatened point on the battlefield then dismounting to fight). In other theatres the cavalry retained much of its importance, but on every front the horse was far more important as a transport animal, providing most of the motive power available for just about every purpose.

One of the most impressive things to emerge from the text is the shear scale of the effort required to produce horses for the army. Vast numbers of horses came from the United States, where an equally large organisation was set up to handle them. The Home Nations provided 400,000 horse, and in 1918 the army had over 800,000 horses, mules, donkeys and similar on its books!

This is a splendidly illustrated book, given added value by the accompanying text, which helps place the pictures both in their immediate context, and in the wide context of the war and the huge demand for horse power.

Chapters
1 - Recruiting the War Horses
2 - Cavalry
3 - Guns and Artillery
4 - The Somme and the Western Front
5 - The Desert
6 - Salonika and Gallipoli
7 - Around the World
8 - The Americans
9 - The Home Front
10 - The End of the War
11 - Resurrection

Author: John Fairley
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 160
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2015



HORSES OF THE GREAT WAR: THE STORY IN ART

Horses of the Great War uses a wide range of superb contemporary paintings to explain the contribution of countless innocent horses to the war effort and victory. These works supported by informed commentary tell how the horses were rounded up from all over the world in their hundreds of thousands how the cavalry halted the German advance in 1914 and again in 1918 how Australian and Indian swept through the deserts of Palestine and Arabia, overwhelming the Turks and performing incredible feats of endurance. The Western Front in France and Belgium relied on horses for supply of everything from shells and ammunition to food and water in atrocious and perilous conditions. While the vets kept the suffering horses alive and well, in the end, vast numbers were slaughtered or sold. All this is reflected in the paintings of distinguished artists such as Sir John Lavery, Sir Alfred Munnings and Stanley Spencer who painted at the front. The book will appeal beyond those fascinated by the war itself to all those of both sexes and all ages who relate to horses.


Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley - History

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Horses of the Great War uses a wide range of superb contemporary paintings to explain the contribution of countless innocent horses to the war effort and victory. These works supported by informed commentary tell how the horses were rounded up from all over the world in their hundreds of thousands how the cavalry halted the German advance in 1914 and again in 1918 how Australian and Indian swept through the deserts of Palestine and Arabia, overwhelming the Turks and performing incredible feats of endurance.
The Western Front in France and Belgium relied on horses for supply of everything from shells and ammunition to food and water in atrocious and perilous conditions. While the vets kept the suffering horses alive and well, in the end, vast numbers were slaughtered or sold.
All this is reflected in the paintings of distinguished artists such as Sir John Lavery, Sir Alfred Munnings and Stanley Spencer who painted at the front.

The book will appeal beyond those fascinated by the war itself to all those of both sexes and all ages who relate to horses.

This book is fantastic, for the enthusiast of history, of art, of horses, you cannot miss in your library such a profound testimony of what was a huge sacrifice for beautiful animals.

Read the full Italian review here

Old Barbed Wire Blog

This is an illuminating and sobering book. If you have any interest in horses and history and the art that goes with them, you shouldn't miss this.

Racing Post, December 2016 – reviewed by Brough Scott

This is a splendidly illustrated book, given added value by the accompanying text, which helps place the pictures both in their immediate context, and in the wide context of the war and the huge demand for horse power.

Read the full review here.

John Rickard - History of War

The number of horses involved in the First World War was astonishing, likewise their feats of endurance. Millions went but few came back so this is a welcome account of their achievements in both words and pictures.

This England Summer 2016

The author, well known for his books on the equestrian art, has brought together a wonderful selection of contemporary paintings graphically illustrating the extraordinary contribution of countless innocent horses.
Horses of the Great War with it's informative commentary and the wonderful paintings provides a brilliant reminder of our debt to man's faithful servant.

The Bulletin of the Military Historical Society No.264

The many battle paintings of the Great War and magnificent and a timely reminder that the Army, including the cavalry, helped with some of the 'heavy lifting' during the Great War. Well done.

Scuttlebutt, ed. No 52, 2016 - John Roberts

The number of horses involved in the First World War was astonishing, likewise their feats of endurance. Millions went but few came back so this is a welcome account of their achievements in both words and pictures.

Although Allied cavalry halted some enemy advances, most equine work was moving ammunition, food, water and general supplies.

This England, Summer 2016

Horses of the Great War, with its lively narration and well-chosen imagery, contributes to a better understanding of the toll war takes on all of those who participate in battle, human and animal like.
I cannot recommend it highly enough.

Lesley Ann-Gentry

A beautiful book, richly illustrated throughout.

VaeVictus No.125

I do have an interest in modelling and I do have an interest in military history. So, when I first saw the title of this book I did wonder about what ideas a modeller might get from it for the colours and shading styles that might be transferable to painting small scale 3-dimensional models of horses. Whilst I did find it useful for this, I also discovered that it holds a lot more to interest the military historian about the period of WW1 as well.

Today we think more about journalists and news camera crews going to cover war zones, but the illustrations that are used to illustrate the different elements of the story of the horse throughout the book also gives a good idea of the large number of artists who went out to cover the war. The paintings are a delight to see, while the story that surrounds them throws more light on the amazing contribution that horses made to the Great War, and the vast numbers that were involved. As I said at the outset, a book I might have passed by but I am so glad I didn't. Well worth reading and some fine ideas for modellers as well.

Military Modelling Online - Robin Buckland

The big surprise of this book is quite how much horse action there was around the rest of the world.
This is an illuminating and sobering book. You should read it.

Racing Post Sunday

Horses of the Great War, with its lively narration and well-chosen imagery, contributes to a better understanding of the toll war takes on all of those who participate in battle, human and animal alike. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

Chiron Calling - Lesley Anne Gentry & Jamie Anne Gentry

It wasn’t just human beings on all sides in The Great War that paid a terrible cost, the horses they depended on paid just as high a price in death and suffering.

I doubt this could be better portrayed than in this beautifully produced collection of paintings of horses from The Great War. The text is learned and sympathetic and just right, while the reproductions of the paintings are superb. As with the previously reviewed ‘The Great War Illustrated: 1915’, every picture truly does tell a story.

A truly moving book highlighting a side of the Great War people don’t always think of…but should.

Destructive Music - Steve Earles

Published by Pen and Sword and retailing at modest £25.00 Fairley’s work has 134 pages containing over 65 stunning colour artworks. A quick flick of the pages and I was pleasantly surprised by the number of these that I had not seen previously something I was not expecting. I was again satisfied to see works by my favourite artist Lucy Kemp-Welch, but her presence was to be expected on the pages of a work such this.
I will not divulge too many of the artworks within the book as I feel it would spoil the reader’s enjoyment. The first image you are greeted with is “The Charge of Flowerdew’s Squadron” by Sir Alfred Cummings, portraying the charge of Lord Strathcona's Horse at the Battle of Moreuil Wood in March 1918. This choice of this magnificent work immediately sets the tone of the book to see a full blown cavalry charge enacted as late as 1918 already casts aspersions on the common belief that the Cavalry, or even the horse had no part to play in a modern warfare where the machine gun, artillery and all of the recent innovations had cast our equine companions to pages of history nearly four years before.
The book starts with a brief introduction of horse life in the civilian world, namely in London. Interesting facts and statistics take us through their hard daily routines and usage to their unceremonious end in the capital’s slaughterers’ yards, then taking us on to the recruiting and procurement of the War Horses, again packed with facts and anecdotes from the period. I found the segment on the purchase of horses and their transport across North America very interesting, all accompanied by plenty of fantastic full page artworks by artists whose letters home and experiences feature in the text.
The rest of the book takes a reasonably brief, but more than adequate look into the use of Allied cavalry on the Western front, Salonika and the Middle East, offering a refreshing take on the actual successes and failures of the cavalry throughout the war. Further artworks by Bastien, Munnings and many others make a welcome appearance, all full page and in a quality print. Other chapters tell the story of the horses and the much forgotten mules of the artillery and transport units. The book finishes up with life on the home front and then finally the end of the war and the demobilisation and disposal of the horses. The facts and figures within this chapter do not make easy reading, no matter how many times you are exposed to them. All of the chapters are packed with facts, statistics and interesting stories that will more than hold the attention of most readers and especially those readers new to the subject. For myself the superb, well-chosen and varied style of artwork throughout really is the star attraction to this publication.
As the title suggests, this is no great in-depth study on the procurement, care or tactics in relation to equine usage during the war, for such information you will need to seek the works of Graham Winton or David Kenyon. However the information within is interestingly presented in a not-too sentimental way but in a passionate and digestible fashion, this is not entirely a “picture book”. I would consider myself well read and somewhat knowledgeable in the subject and the text did offer a number of new insights and plenty of accounts from individuals I had not come across previously. It is very refreshing to see a break away from the usual depiction of the cavalry in the Great War that has suffered from “the amnesia of hindsight” over the decades. The author is not overly biased and just as importantly not overly sentimental in his approach. Fairley’s work does go a small way to setting right a few myths and this impressed and rather surprised me.
At times the information can perhaps be somewhat simplistic and I would question some of the author’s nomenclature (Romney instead of Romsey), I also found the cropping and positioning of some of the artworks a little odd but these are just minor irritations within a brilliant work with a well researched and very interesting commentary. I admit to being biased on the subject, as you can imagine, especially as the 10th and the 11th Hussar’s get a brief mention, but the very affordable price for a book of this quality is worth it for the stunning artwork and the stories behind those pictures alone.

Toby Brayley, 'HorsePower' The Museum of the King's Royal Hussars in Winchester

'Supported by informed, sympathetic and lively commentary and first-hand accounts. '

Malton & Pickering Mercury

'If history and horses, military and wars are your thing, Horses of the Great War will make for a fascinating read.'

Yorkshire Gazette & Herald

John Fairley has written numerous books on equestrian art including The Art of the Horse, Racing in Art and Great Racehorses in Art. He was joint author of The Monocled Mutineer, which became a celebrated BBC television series.
A noted documentary and sports television producer, he was Director of Programmes at Yorkshire Television. Born in Liverpool, within sight of the Grand National course, he served as an RNVR officer aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Albion. A scholar of The Queen's College, Oxford, he is married, with three daughters, and lives in the Yorkshire racing town of Malton.


Art History Timelines

These interactive timelines are used to graphically and logically illustrate the progression of visual art.

They aim to educate and introduce topics using technology and the interactive capabilities of the web.


Overseas

The Remount Department also looked for help overseas, spending over £36 million (about £1.5 billion in today’s money) buying animals around the world, especially from America and Canada. More than 600,000 horses and mules were shipped from North America.

Travelling by sea was as dangerous for horses as it was for humans. Thousands of animals were lost, mainly from disease, shipwreck and injury caused by rolling vessels. In 1917, more than 94,000 horses were sent from North America to Europe and 3,300 were lost at sea. Around 2,700 of these horses died when submarines and other warships sank their vessels.

On 28 June 1915, the horse transport SS ‘Armenian’ was torpedoed by U-24 off the Cornish coast. Although the surviving crew were allowed to abandon ship, the vessel's cargo of 1,400 horses and mules were not so lucky and all perished.

Unloading horses at Boulogne, c1916


Powwow Highway (1989)

Jonathan Wacks’ boisterous road movie combines the comedy antics of protagonist Buddy Red Bow (A Martinez) with social commentary on Native American land rights. It thus puts a different spin on the traditional relationship between the Cheyenne and avaricious whites, demonstrating that Manifest Destiny is far from played out. The story is far from unrelentingly serious: it features comic jail breaks, marijuana trades, and even ‘bromances.’ Powwow Highway won the Sundance Filmmaker’s Trophy and three Native American Film Festival Awards.


Hollywood War Movies Based On True Stories

Since most of these are historical war movies, you might have known the story before, but isn’t that the exciting part? All these combat actions by the soldiers take us to the history classes we missed. Here’s a list of best Hollywood War Movies based on true stories and events. These are not just the films based on war (WW1, WW2, etc.), but even about Military and Army world. We managed to include both the old and new movies on this list!

1. The Great Escape (1963)

Imprisoned in German POW camp during World War II, a group of allied forces soldiers plans to break out from the prison. But not just get out, they want to divert German soldiers attention as well so that coalition forces can take over. But when their escape becomes a reality, they realize that the stakes are much higher than they thought.

2. Platoon (1986)

Chris Taylor, a student, gives up his studies to enlist in Vietnam war. But when he gets to the ground, his courage and idealism fade. A growing hidden conflict between his two staff sergeants turns the soldiers against each other and then, all hell breaks loose!

3. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

What happens when two friends come under training for Vietnam war? One of them takes a detour, and another one graduates to Marine Corps and is shipped to Vietnam as a journalist. But even he gets stuck covering and eventually participating in Bloody Battle of Hue. Will he survive to see another day?

4. Schindler’s List (1993)

Oskar Schindler wants to make money from the brimming World War II. He wants to open a factory in Krakow but lacks workers. Thanks to his political expediency, he hires Jewish workers in his factory. But when SS begins the extermination of Jews in Krakow Ghetto, Schindler pulls up his sleeves to help his workers and save them.

5. Saving Private Ryan (1998)

A Spielberg masterpiece, Saving Private Ryan is a powerful, realistic re-creation of WWII’s D-day invasion and its immediate aftermath. Tom Hanks essays the role of Capt. John Miller (Tom Hanks) who along with his men locate Pvt. James Ryan (Matt Damon) and get him back to the United States. This close-knit squad goes through a barrage of enemy fires and loss of life to locate one soldier using their experience from the exploits of Italy and North Korea. What makes this film so good? The 24 minute Omaha Beach scene could only be created by Spielberg. With bodies of US soldiers scattered everywhere, the place looks no less than hell.

6. The Thin Red Line (1998)

Set during the World War II, ‘The Thin Red Line’ is a drama film based on James Jones’s autobiographical novel. The film is about one man, Private Witt, who is left on a Pacific island with the natives. A deserter who now lives a life of peace and harmony, Witt finds himself captured and debriefed by the US Navy. He is soon assigned to a new role at the Battle of Guadalcanal but little does Witt, and his fellow soldiers are aware of what awaits them.

7. Men of Honor (2000)

‘Men of Honor’ is a military drama based on the life of the first African-American diver to serve in the United States Navy, Carl Brashear. The film boasts of some fine acting by Cuba Gooding Jr. who plays the role of Brashear and Robert De Niro as Master Chief Billy Sunday. The film portrays Brashear’s life, from being in a sharecropping family to living his dream in the US Navy. While in the diving school, a young Carl Brashear is subject to severe racism with his white comrades refusing to share even barracks with him. Eventually getting impressed by Brashear’s sheer courage and determination, Master Chief Sunday takes, Brashear in and becomes his ally in fighting the prejudice, military bureaucracy, and even a crippling injury to make his dream come true.

8. The Enemy at the Gates (2001)

Based on true story of a Russian sniper Vasily Grigoryevich Zaytsev, The Enemy at the Gates features the battle of Stalingrad which was fought for 5 and a half months between Nazi’s and Russian Army. During this struggle, a sniper caught everyone’s attention that killed 225 Nazi soldiers using his skills.

9. Pearl Harbour (2001)

Based on real-life historical events, the movie captures the story of two best friends who fall for the same girl. Rafe and Danny both enter World War II as pilots. Rafe is so eager to fight that he joins England’s Air Force command. Back at home, his girlfriend, Evelyn finds comfort in arms of Danny. But when Rafe comes back, he confronts Danny. But everything changes when Japanese troops drop bombs on Pearl Harbour station of Navy.

10. Black Hawk Down (2001)

Black Hawk Down is based on a United States military operation that took place in Mogadishu, Somalia, codenamed ‘Operation Gothic Serpent.’ Director by Ridley Scott, the film is based on articles and book by reporter Mark Bowden. The film traces the battle through streets of civil war-torn Somalia when over 100 Delta Force soldiers and Army Rangers are dropped to kidnap two close aides of local warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid. With Josh Hartnett as Staff Sgt. Matt Eversmann, Tom Sizemore as Ranger Lt. Col. Danny McKnight, William Fichtner as Delta Sgt. First Class Jeff Sanderson, Ewan McGregor as Ranger Spec. Grimes and Eric Bana as SFC Norm “Hoot” Gibson, the film holds a solid cast. Voted as one of the top films of the year, the film recreates the scenes of bravery and heroics by the US Forces, who decided to leave no man behind, whether dead or alive. The attraction of the film is its camera work and Black Hawk Helicopters.

11. Behind Enemy Lines (2001)

“You’re at war every time you board this ship unless we’re parked at San Diego Bay.” Behind Enemy Lines stars Owen Wilson as Lt. Chris Burnett, a naval aviator aboard the U.S.S. Carl Vinson. Being out action most of the time, Burnett has become brash and frustrated. Burnett’s life takes a roller coaster ride when his commander, Admiral Reigert (Gene Hackman), assigns him on a photographic reconnaissance over the remote area of the Balkans. During their flight, Burnett and his pilot, Stackhouse capture horrific images that prove genocidal crimes by the local militia. Their F18 is soon shot down, Stackhouse executed and injured Burnett is left to fight for his life. Lokar, a Serbian paramilitary head launches a manhunt to get Burnett before he could expose the crimes to the world. Gene Hackman gives a powerful performance as he heads a covert rescue mission and losing the command of his ship in the process.

12. We Were Soldiers (2002)

Based on the best-selling book and true story, We Were Soldiers is a war drama which shows the story of the first battle between the United States and Vietnam forces. A film that depicts bonds of soldiers among their troops truly. The valor, loyalty, and heroism is something which attracted many viewers to this movie.


Horses of the Great War - The Story in Art, John Fairley - History

Horses of the Great War uses a wide range of superb contemporary paintings to explain the contribution of countless innocent horses to the war effort and victory. These works supported by informed commentary tell how the horses were rounded up from all over the world in their hundreds of thousands how the cavalry halted the German advance in 1914 and again in 1918 how Australian and Indian swept through the deserts of Palestine and Arabia, overwhelming the Turks and performing incredible feats of endurance.

The Western Front in France and Belgium relied on horses for supply of everything from shells and ammunition to food and water in atrocious and perilous conditions. While the vets kept the suffering horses alive and well, in the end, vast numbers were slaughtered or sold.
All this is reflected in the paintings of distinguished artists such as Sir John Lavery, Sir Alfred Munnings and Stanley Spencer who painted at the front.

The book will appeal beyond those fascinated by the war itself to all those of both sexes and all ages who relate to horses.


The Legend of John Henry: Talcott, WV

John Henry statue and the Great Bend Tunnel

In the early 1870s, construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway along the Greenbrier and New Rivers employed thousands of workers. Many of these men were African Americans who migrated to West Virginia in search of jobs. Jobs on the railroad were labor intensive and low paying, required long hours, and were at times dangerous.

Railroad workers primarily used shovels, wheelbarrows, mules, and black powder to move millions of tons of rock and dirt to prepare the railroad bed. Workers used axe and adz to cut and shape hundreds of trees into ties, bridge timbers, and lumber for railcars. They sweated in the hot summer sun and froze in the cold mountain winters as they worked to connect Tidewater Virginia with the Ohio River Valley.

As the C&O Railway stretched westward along the Greenbrier River, The Legend of John Henry was born at Big Bend Mountain near Talcott, West Virginia. The Legend of John Henry is just that, a “legend,” and through the legend, John Henry became a symbol. He symbolized the many African Americans whose sweat and hard work built and maintained the rails across West Virginia. He was a symbol for the black workers who gave their lives in these dangerous occupations. The legend, as told through ballads and work songs, has kept the story of John Henry and the black railroad workers alive.

In February of 1870, workers began drilling the Great Bend Tunnel where the Greenbrier River makes a seven-mile meander around Big Bend Mountain. Over 800 men, many of them African American, cut a 6,450 foot-long tunnel through the mountain. The workers cut through layers of red shale, which tended to disintegrate when exposed to air, making the tunnel a dangerous place to work. Rock falls were common and death was always a possibility. At nearly a mile and one quarter long, the Great Bend Tunnel is the longest on the C&O Railway.

Workers digging the Crozet Tunnel The process of building a tunnel in the 1870s was slow and difficult work. Holes were drilled into the layers of rock using a hand drill and hammer. Holes were then filled with powder and blasted in order to make the rock small enough to remove from the tunnel. The drill was held by a “shaker” who turned it slightly after each blow and gave it a shake to flip the rock dust out of the hole. The “steel driver” swung the hammer as hard and as often as he could, pounding the drill into the rock.

As the story goes, John Henry was hired as a steel driver for the railroad. Later, the railroad company brought in a steam drill to speed up work on the tunnel. It was said that the steam drill could drill faster than any man. The challenge was on, “man against machine.” John Henry was known as the strongest, the fastest, and the most powerful man working on the railroad. He went up against the steam drill to prove that the black worker could drill a hole through the rock farther and faster than the drill could. Using two 10-pound hammers, one in each hand, he pounded the drill so fast and so hard that he drilled a 14-foot hole into the rock. The legend says that the drill was only able to drill nine feet. John Henry beat the steam drill and later died of exhaustion.

The Great Bend Tunnel was completed on September 12, 1872, and remained in service until 1974. The tunnel and the man have been cemented into the annals of time through The Ballad of John Henry. The song tells of a boy born with a "hammer in his hand.” It tells of a man who worked as a steel driver during the construction of the Great Bend Tunnel. It tells us that this man took a hammer in each hand to face down a steam-powered drilling machine. John Henry promised, "If I can't beat this steam drill down, I'll die with this hammer in my hand!" At the Great Bend Tunnel, John Henry became one of the world’s great folk heroes.

Sources
Turner, Charles W., et al. Chessie's Road. Alderson: C&O Historical Society, 1986.

Dixon, Thomas W. Jr. Chesapeake & Ohio Alleghany Subdivision. Alderson: C&O Historical Society, 1985.

Lane, Ron "Great Bend Tunnel." e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia. 13 February 2012. Web. 20 July 2016.
Hampel, Carlene, The Man - Facts, Fiction and Themes, 1998


6. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

Inarguably one of the best films on this list, The Good, the Bad and the Uglyalso is quite arguably a Civil War film. Hence, this relatively low ranking on a Civil War list. Nonetheless, it represents an interesting reason as to why there are so few true blue Civil War movies in the latter half of the 20 th century: a genuine distaste for the subject.

Director Sergio Leone fancied himself as something of a history buff and had studied with great enthusiasm the horrors of the Andersonville camp years before the third part of his “Dollars Trilogy” came about. Thus, he claimed to understand the American Civil War, but scoffed at the concept that only the “losers” of the conflict committed such mistreatment to prisoners of war. Granted, much of it had to do with the dwindling supplies and resources in the southern states as the war dragged on than it did with any sort of pure malevolence, but Leone (with heavy revisionism) imagined that the better-funded Union was just as cruel to prisoners out of spite.

So when Clint Eastwood’s good anti-hero and Eli Wallach’s not-so-good, ugly bandit are captured by Union troops, they are tortured within an inch of their lives. Other Union soldiers are depicted better when feuding over a bridge with a Confederate army commanded by Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley—who incidentally really did engineer a failed campaign from Texas into the American Southwest in 1862 in an attempt to take Santa Fe, gold resources along the Rockies, and cut off California—but all parties are ultimately presented as moronic, fighting over a bridge that neither side truly needs.

More a general commentary on the stupidity and pointlessness of war during the era when America was just ramping up its Vietnam madness, the Civil War in The Good, the Bad and the Uglydoes not bear broad similarities to any specific event. But it makes for a powerful backdrop in one of the best Westerns ever made.


Watch the video: Valiant Hearts: The Great War Walkthrough PART 3 (July 2022).


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