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History of LST 1-6 - History

History of LST 1-6 - History


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LST -1

LST-1 was laid down on 20 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 7 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Laurence T. Haugen; and commissioned on 14 December 1942, Lt. W. L. Chessman in command.

During World War I, LST-1 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July 1943

Salerno landings-September 1943

Anzio-Nettuno phase of operations on west coast of Italy--January to March 1944

Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-1 was decommissioned on 21 May 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to the Ships Power and Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.LST-1 earned four battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST-2

LST-2 was laid down on 23 June 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 19 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Nancy Jane Hughes; and commissioned on 9 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-2 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

North African occupation-early 1943

Sicilian occupation-July 1943

Salerno landings-September 1943

Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-2 was decommissioned on 11 April 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines. LST-2 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-3

LST-3 was laid down on 29 June 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 19 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Harlow; and commissioned on 8 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-3 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July to August 1943

Invasion of southern France August to September 1944 LST-3 was decommissioned sometime after World War 11 ended and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 10 September 1947, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping.

LST-3 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-4

LST-4 was laid down on 4 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 9 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs, J. Bartolo; and commissioned on 14 February 1943.

During World War II, LST-4 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July 1943

Salerno landings-September 1943

West coast of Italy operations-Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January and February 1944; June 1944

Invasion of southern France August and September 19441 LST-4 was decomissioned sometime after World War II ended and was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 10 September 1947, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping.

LST-4 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-5

LST-5 was laid down on 12 July 1942 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 3 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Wanetta Rose Barker; and commissioned on 22 February 1943.

During World War 11, LST-5 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

LST-5 was decommissioned sometime after World War 11 ended and was struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947. On 7 October 1947, she was sold to the Tung Hwa Trading Co., of Singapore, for scrapping.

LST-5 earned three battle stars for World War IT I service.

LST-6

LST-6 was laid down on 20 July 1942 at Wilmington, Del., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 21 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. H. E. Haven; and commissioned on 30 January 1943.

During World War II, LST-6 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

On 17 November 1944, she was mined and sunk in six fathoms of water while en route from Rouen, France, to Portland, England. She was struck from the Navy list on 22 December 1944.

LST-6 earned three battle stars for World War II service.


Welcome aboard the only operational LST in WWII configuration afloat in US waters.

The LST-325—the last fully operational WWII Landing Ship Tank (LST)—is open for tours seasonally throughout the year in her home port of Evansville, Indiana. She leaves port in the early fall to sail the nation’s inland rivers. Her crew of volunteers shares the history of these incredible vessels, the men and women who built them, and those who served on them.

Our primary concern is the health and safety of our visitors, volunteers, and staff members. Tours of the LST-325 will be altered to better meet recommended “social distancing” practices. Visitors are encouraged to wear masks and may be subject to temperature checks before joining tours.

We will continue to monitor and assess the situation to determine if any further action is required. Updates will be shared via Facebook, Twitter, and our website. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience and understanding.


LST History

The Landing Ship Tank is an ocean going ship capable of shore to shore delivery of tanks, amphibious assault vehicles, and troops.

The LST program was developed in response to a need for armored infantry divisions in invasions by sea. England's failed invasion at Dunkirk prompted Prime Minister Winston Churchill to request that the United States design a ship that was large enough to traverse an ocean, but with provisions to quickly and efficiently unload armored vehicles and personnel on an unimproved beach. The resulting ship design proved to be among the most successful in the history of the Navy.

The ships were designed with an innovative ballast system which allowed the flat-bottomed ships to sit lower in the water during ocean transit for seaworthiness purposes, then, by pumping the ballast tanks dry, to raise up in the water, facilitating shallow-draft landing operations. The ballast system was adapted from the systems used by fleet submarines.

The design for the first LST was submitted by John C. Niedermair in November of 1941. The sketch he made became the design for more than 1,000 L.S.T.'s. After a few alterations the final length was 328 ft., a 50 ft. beam, and a draft of 3 ft. 9½ in. She was able to ride higher in the water when in landing trim.

LSTs were a high priority during the war, the second-largest shipbuilding initiative in the history of Mankind. Before the tests were completed on the LST, construction had already commenced. The LST was built in a variety of "Cornfield Navy" shipyards, in rather unlikely locales: Seneca, Ill. Evansville and Jeffersonville, Ind. and Pittsburgh and Ambridge, Penn. The Navy was forced to modify bridges, through a "Ferry Command," to bring the LSTs to the oceans. About 670 LSTs were constructed inland.

Many other LSTs were built in existing Navy yards. In fact, the first LST actually took the berth of an already laid aircraft carrier keel at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation, so important was the LST construction program.

In total, eighteen shipyards produced more than a thousand LSTs in three years, a remarkable feat by any reckoning.

At the beginning of 1943, the schedule allowed four months from the time the keel was laid on a new LST to her final fitting-out and commissioning that schedule was reduced to two months by the end of the war.

From June 1943 in the Solomons to August 1945, the LST was a key element in WWII. They participated in Sicily, Italy, Normandy, Southern France, the liberation of the Philippines, and the capture of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Out of 1,051 LST class ships built, more than a thousand survived through the end of World War II several WWII LST's served through the Vietnam War era. Though slow by today's amphibious Navy standards, the ships were well designed for a variety of tasks besides the primary mission of armored invasion force delivery.

Even though the crew members nicknamed their ships "Large Slow Targets," the LST endured. There were only 26 losses to enemy actions. At the end of World War II the navy had a large inventory of LSTs. This remarkable warship that performed vital services in the fight for freedom now are almost extinct. Roughly half were scrapped, 20 percent were converted for commercial use, 18 percent were sold to foreign governments, 9 percent sunk, and a few went into private hands their fate is unknown.


The ship was laid down on 17 October 1942, under Maritime Commission (MARCOM) contract, MC hull 987, by Kaiser Shipyards, Vancouver, Washington launched 21 November 1942 and commissioned on 3 March 1943, [1] Lieutenant Albert Schlott, USNR, in command. [2]

During World War II, LST-467 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater. She took part in the Eastern New Guinea operation, the Lae occupation in September 1943 the Bismarck Archipelago operation, the Cape Gloucester, New Britain landings from December 1943 through February 1944 Hollandia operation in April 1944 the Western New Guinea operations, the Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area operation in May 1944, the Biak Islands operation in June 1944, the Noemfoor Island operation in June and July 1944, the Cape Sansapor operation in August 1944, and the Morotai landing in September 1944 the Leyte operation in October and November 1944 the Lingayen Gulf landings in January 1945 the consolidation and capture of the Southern Philippines, the Palawan Island landings in March 1945, the Visayan Island landings in March 1945 and the Borneo operation, the Tarakan Island operation in April and May 1945. [3]

Following the war, LST-467 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 28 May 1946, and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 22 November 1946, the tank landing ship was sold to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, California. [3]

She was later resold to the St. Charles Transportation Co., which was a subsidiary of Anglo Canadian Pulp and Paper Mills, of Montreal, Quebec. She was modified by Davie Shipbuilding & Repairing Co., of Lauzon, Quebec, for use as a log hauler. [2]

LST-467 earned eight battle stars for her World War II service. [2]


History of LST 1-6 - History

LST - 85 - 125

LST-85 through LST-116 contracts were cancelled on 16 September 1942.

LST-117 was laid down on 28 April 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 10 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Robert B. Sutherland and commissioned on 27 August 1943.

During World War 11, LST-117 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Leyte landings-October 1944

Following the war, LST-117 was redesignated LSTH- 117 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 16 February 1946 redesignated LST- 117 on 6 March 1952 and transferred to MSTS for service as USNS LST-117 (T-LST-117) on 31 March 1952. She was struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1973.

LST-117 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-118 was laid down on 21 April 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 21 July 1943 sponsored by Miss Dorothy Korrell and commissioned on 6 September 1943, Lt. Clarence W. Lundberg in command.

During World War II, LST-118 was assigned to the Asiatic Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Hollandia,operation-April 1944 Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-JuIy 1944

Leyte landings-October 1944

Following the war, LST-118 was redesignated LSTH-118 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 8 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 29 September 1947. On 28 April 1948, she was sold to the Dulien Steel Products, Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LSTH-118 earned three battle stars for World War II service as LST-118.

LST-119 was laid down on 12 May 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 28 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Gilbert Coughlin and commissioned on 1 September 1943, Lt. (jg.) R. D. Dewar, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-119 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

Upon her return to the United States, LST-119 was decommissioned on 13 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 17 May 1948, she was sold to Robert H. Beattie, Oil Transport Co., New

Orleans, La., for conversion to non-self-propelled operation.

LST-119 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-120 was laid down on 5 May 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 7 August 1943 sponsored by Miss Laura K. Richert and commissioned on 22 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-120 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

(b) Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944

During the fall of 1945, LST-120 performed postwar occupation duty in the Far East.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 7 January 1946. She was transferred to the United States Military Government for Korea as a sale in February 1947 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 March 1947.

LST-120 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-121 was laid down on 23 May 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 16 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. H. A. Bayless and commissioned on 29 September 1943, Lt. John P. Devaney, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-121 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

(b) Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944

Western Caroline Islands operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Island s-S eptember and October 1944

(a) Assault and occupation of Iwo JimaFebruary 1945

Following the war, LST-121 was redesignated LSTH-121 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 21 March 1946. On 14 April 1946, she was sold to the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., of Chester, Pa., for scrapping. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946.

LSTH-121 earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-121.

LST-122 was laid down on 4 June 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 9 August 1943 and commissioned on 3 September 1943, Lt. Samuel C. Pirie in command.

During World War II, LST-122 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

Hollandia operation-April 1944

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - May 1945

Following the war, LST-122 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until early May 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 4 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-122 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-123 was laid down on 5 June 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 14 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. C. B. Enlow and commissioned on 7 September 1943, Lt. Francis P. Rossiter, USNR, in command.

During World War 11, LST-123 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations :

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Leyte landings-October 1944 Lingayen landings in Luzon-January 1945 Following the war, L - ST-123 was redesignated LSTH- 123 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 22 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. On 30 March 1948, she was sold to the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., of Chester, Pa., for scrapping.

LSTH-123 earned three battle stars for World War II service as LST-123.

LST-124 was laid down on 7 June 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 18 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Hunt Greathouse and commissioned on 24 September 1943, Ens. William A. Bartos in command.

During World War II, LST-124 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

(b ) Tinian capture and occupation-June 1944

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto -May and June 1945

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1946. On 13 December 1947, she was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-124 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-125 was laid down on 8 June 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 23 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. W. R. Durham and commissioned on 29 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-125 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Leyte landings-October 1944

Lingayen landings on Luzon-January 1945

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - April 1945

Following the war, LST-125 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until early June 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 10 June 1946. She was sunk as a target, by naval gunfire, on 14 August 1946, and struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946.


Clifford E. Mosier using a sextant, LST-325 CO, 1943-1945

Bay of Tunis, July 1943, LST-325 is loaded up for the invasion of Sicily

LST-325 arrived in Oran on 13 April 1943 and spent the next three months going between the ports of Arzew and Mostaganem. During this time she practiced loading and beaching operations with various American and English Army units. On 28 June LST-325 arrived at La Goulette in the Bay of Tunis to prepare for Operation HUSKY, the invasion of Sicily.

On July 10 LST-325, as part of the KOOL Force (the floating reserve for the DIME Force going ashore at Gela) left Tunis, arriving in the Bay of Gela on 11 July. They remained here until the morning of the 12th before unloading the vehicles and men of the 1st Armored Division onto LCTs. They made six more trips to Sicily in support of the offensive before Messina fell on 17 August, twice bringing back loads of Italian prisoners.

On 6 September 1943 while in Bizerte, Tunisia four members of the crew were injured during an air raid. On 13 September LST-325 sailed as part of the Northern Attack Force in support of the invasion at Salerno, Italy carrying elements of the 40th Royal Tank Regiment. Four members of the crew and four British soldiers were injured during an attack by German fighter-bombers as the ship entered the attack area. LST-325 made four trips to the beachhead at Salerno, the last trip carrying members of a Ceylanese infantry regiment from Tripoli, Libya.

In late October 1943 LST-325 returned to Oran, leaving there on 12 November as part of a large convoy of ships for England. On 21 November the convoy was attacked by German bombers using the new remote-controlled glider-bombs. Several transport ships were sunk and one passenger aboard LST-325 was severely wounded by shrapnel. LST-325 entered Plymouth, England on Thanksgiving Day, 25 November 1943.

Unloading across pontoon causeway at Salerno, September 1943

LST 325 Crew photograph, circa 1944

From December 1943 until March 1944 LST-325 was involved in several training exercises along the southwestern English coast before receiving upgrades in preparation for what was to come. On 5 June 1944 LST-325 sailed from Falmouth, England carrying elements of the 5th Special Engineer Brigade. LST-325 was part of Force "B", the back-up force for the troops going ashore at Omaha Beach on 6 June. On 7 June they anchored off Omaha Beach and unloaded the men and vehicles onto DUKW's and LCM's.

Low tide on a Normandy beach, 12 June 1944

German P.O.W.s disembarking. Courtesy of Mrs. Lloyd Mosby

Between June 1944 and the end of April 1945 LST-325 made 43 round trips between England and France, unloading at Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno and the city of Rouen on the Seine River. Twice they carried loads of ammunition from Omaha Beach to St. Michel on the western shore of the Cotentin peninsula for the Army besieging the port city of Brest. On 28 December 1944 the LST-325 helped rescue approximately 700 men from the troop transport S.S. Empire Javelin, which had been torpedoed off the coast of France. Lt. Comdr. Mosier was awarded the Bronze Star for this rescue.

On 12 May 1945 LST-325 sailed with a convoy from Belfast, Ireland to return to the United States. Two days out from Belfast the convoy was hit by a terrific storm and scattered. LST-325 slammed bow first into a monstrous wave and a crack developed across the main deck. Ship fitters were able to save the ship by welding steel plates across the damaged hull. Blessed by fair weather the rest of the way LST-325 sailed into Norfolk, Virginia on 31 May 1945.


Freedom Of Speech

The First Amendment guarantees freedom of speech. Freedom of speech gives Americans the right to express themselves without having to worry about government interference. It’s the most basic component of freedom of expression.

The U.S. Supreme Court often has struggled to determine what types of speech is protected. Legally, material labeled as obscene has historically been excluded from First Amendment protection, for example, but deciding what qualifies as obscene has been problematic. Speech provoking actions that would harm others—true incitement and/or threats—is also not protected, but again determining what words have qualified as true incitement has been decided on a case-by-case basis.


Seeking deck logs of LST-972

Jason Atkinson 20.04.2020 11:12 (в ответ на Mary Cavagnaro)

Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

We searched the National Archives Catalog and located the Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships and Stations, 1941 - 1983 in the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel (Record Group 24) that include the deck logs of LST-972 for 22 January 1945 through 25 June 1946. For copies of these logs, please contact the National Archives at College Park - Textual Reference (RDT2) via email at [email protected] .

Please note that the National Archives and Records Administration has suspended reproduction and digitization services until further notice due to COVID-19. Orders will not be serviced until operations can resume safely. We apologize for any inconvenience. Once operations resume, document reproduction requests will be filled in the order in which they were received. 

We also located World War II War Diaries, Other Operational Records and Histories, ca. 1/1/1942 - ca. 6/1/1946 in the Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Record Group 38) that contains war diaries and reports concerning the LST-972’s activities during World War 2. These records have been digitized and may be viewed online through the Catalog . Please keep in mind that the Catalog does not always list files in chronological order.

Plus, we located Muster Rolls of U.S. Navy Ships, Stations, and Other Naval Activities, 1/1/1939 - 1/1/1949 in Record Group 24 that includes muster rolls of  LST-972 for 22 January 1945 through 25 June 1946, which also have been digitized and may be viewed online through the Catalog .

In addition, we searched the website of the Naval History and Heritage Command and located an article about LST-972 as well as the United States Pacific Fleet Organization  1 May 1945 that lists the LST-972.


Photos of LST 325, Floating Tribute to the WWII Generation

USS LST 325 is a floating veteran, a steel memory that honors the World War II generation. Launched October 27, 1942, it was commissioned February 1, 1943. It served in the Mediterranean Theater and during the D-Day invasion of Normandy, engaged in arctic operations in the 1950s and later was sold to the Greek Navy, where it was L-144 (A/G Syros).

Purchased by USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc., in 2000, the ship sailed 6,500 miles from Crete to Mobile, Alabama, before traveling on to Evansville, Indiana, where it is based today. The ship serves as a tribute to the workers on the home front who constructed 1,051 purpose-built LSTs between 1942 and war’s end to the crews who operated them and to the fighting men who disembarked from them with tanks, jeeps, trucks and other implements of war. LST 325‘s home now is Evansville, Indiana, but each year it travels to another city to allow tours of the ship outside its home berth, setting this ship apart from drydocked LSTs.

In September 2012, LST 325 tied up at the dock at Riverfront Park, Nashville, Tennessee, for several days. The color photos below were taken during that visit by World History Group’s senior editor for digital media, Gerald Swick. The World War II–era photos are courtesy of the National Archives. For more information on LST 325, visit The USS LST Ship Memorial Website.

(NOTE: After its visit to Nashville and Clarksville, Tennessee, LST 325 ran aground on a sandbar near Kuttawa, Kentucky. The Coast Guard freed it within a few days. Since LSTs were designed to ground themselves on beaches, it is not believed the boat suffered damage.)

Look for a travel article by Tom Wood about LST 325 in an upcoming issue of World War II magazine.


History of LST 1-6 - History

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The TANK LANDING SHIP (LST) was the brain child of Winston Churchill. He conveyed to President Franklin Roosevelt the need for a ship that could transport battle tanks and heavy rolling equipment over the sea to forward battle areas, delivering the load directly to beachhead. Much importance was given this project. The keel of an aircraft carrier was hastily removed from a dry dock in Newport News, VA, to begin construction of the first LST. Twenty-three LSTs were in commission by the end of 1942.

* Displacement : 1490 tons (lite) 4,080 tons (full load of 2,100 tons)

* Draft: 8' fwd 14'4" aft (full load)

* Speed: 10.8 knots (max) 9 knots (econ)

* Armament: 1 3"/50 DP 1 40mm 6 20mm

* Complement : 7 officers, 204 enlisted

* Power Plant: Diesel engines, twin screws

* Cargo: LSTs carry smaller craft topside, with a tunnel-like hold full of tanks, vehicles, guns or cargo.

The TANK LANDING SHIP (LST) proved to be much more rugged and versatile than her planners ever dreamed of producing. They were used for the transport of tanks (of course), general cargo, locomotives, railroad cars, all types of vehicles, prisoners, casualties and for numerous other purposes.

These ships were first built in the traditional coastal shipyards, but the demand was so great that inland shipyards were created for wartime production. The main deck was so strong that it could carry a fully loaded LCT (Landing Craft-Tank) across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. An LCT weighed 285 tons fully loaded and was over 114 feet in length. These WWII LSTs displaced 1653 tons (4,080 tons fully loaded). The length was 328 feet and the beam was 50 feet. Normally, an LST had a crew of about 120 men and 10 officers, but this varied due to the number of LCVPs that were carried. Many of the first LSTs were six davit ships, requiring additional personnel.

Of the 1,051 LSTs that were built for the U.S. Navy during the World War II, 670 were launched by five major inland shipyards on the Ohio and Illinois rivers. Within a year or so, most LST production had been shifted from coastal shipyards to these inland shipyards. Approximately 131 were built for the Royal Navy. The WWII class of the LST is the largest of a single ship design ever built for the U.S. Navy and placed in commission in such a short period of time.

While some WWII LSTs remained in commission long after the war, none of this class is in commission today. Currently, there are only two LSTs of postwar design in service today. These are the USS Frederick (LST 1184), with Pearl Harbor for a home port, and the USS La Moure County (LST 1194) out of NAB Little Creek, VA. Both are 20-knot vessels. It is worthwhile to check out their home pages by clicking above.

Ex-USS LST-1008 - At Qingdao Naval Museum, PRC

The History of USS LST-325 (1943-1964)

USS LST-325 , a 2366-ton LST-1 class tank landing ship , was built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania. Commissioned in February 1943, she crossed the Atlantic a month later as part of the first convoy of U.S. Navy LSTs to reach the European war zone. LST-325 took part in the invasion of Sicily in July 1943 and the Salerno landings in September. In November, she moved to English waters, where she engaged in invasion rehersals into the following spring. In June 1944, LST-325 was one of the huge fleet that supported the Normandy invasion. She also participated in other operations along the northern coasts of France.

In March 1945, LST-325 crossed the Atlantic from Belfast, Northern Ireland, to the U.S. Overhauled at New Orleans, she was fitted with Brodie gear for launching and recovering light observation airplanes. She briefly exercised with that equipment in August 1945, just before Japan's surrender ended World War II. After a trip to Panama in September-October, she went to Green Cove Springs, Florida, for inactivation and was decommissioned there in July 1946.

LST-325 was brought back into service in about 1951 to take part in the Military Sea Transportation Service's arctic operations. She later received a reinforced bow to better suit her for work in icy waters. LST-325 was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in September 1961 and turned over to the Maritime Administration for inclusion in the National Defense Reserve Fleet. Returned to the Navy in September 1963, she was modernized for further use under the Military Assistance Program. The ship was transferred to Greece in May 1964. Renamed Syros , ( Greek Navy Listing ) she served in the Hellenic Navy until the late 1990s and was acquired by an American LST memorial organization in 2000.

Bronze Sculpture Dedicated To The Men of The LST's in Washington DC. At the U.S. Navy Memorial

Thurs. Oct. 26, 2000. Designed by Mr. Leo C. Irrera & Appropriately Titled As Above

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The Cargo Letter Is A Gator Family -- Our Relative An Office Aboard:

USS La Moure County LST-1194 - Operation Desert Storm

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  4. Rovere

    This section is very useful here. Hope this post is relevant here.

  5. Makale

    Girls lack femininity, and women lack virginity. Sculptural group: Hercules tearing the mouth of a peeing boy. Badge on a 150-kilogram man: Progress made sockets inaccessible to most children - the most gifted die. My friend's wife is not a woman for me ... But if she is pretty. ... ... he is not my friend! Drunkenness - fight! Fuck - fuck! Love is the triumph of imagination over intellect. I hate two things - racism and blacks.



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